Author Topic: Old Kingsferry Bridges  (Read 451 times)

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Offline Smiffy

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2020, 10:13:13 PM »
I wonder what happened to WKM 362? Scrapped, probably.
 
Keith, I was the same with my Corgi's. I remember them being put up into the attic but I think they were all later given away to a younger relative.

Offline Nemo

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2020, 09:51:15 PM »
See also http://www.sct61.org.uk/mdco362 (for the bus).

Offline KeithG

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2020, 06:11:02 PM »
Interesting about the toll smiffy.....


As a kid I always cherished my material things..... All my Dinky Toys went back in the boxes after playing.


There are two books pictured the top left one is laying on the opened one which has a double decker on the front so suitable for the picture.
Nostalgia is a thing of the past

Offline Smiffy

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2020, 02:31:04 PM »
I believe there was a right granted to levy a toll on all strangers using the ferry by Henry IV in 1401 which could be the origin of the "Kings Ferry" title, although up until the 16th century it was referred to as the "Trinhide ferry" and later as "Trinhide, alias the King's Ferry" in written accounts.
 
Your bus book looks like it's in nearly mint condition.




Offline KeithG

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2020, 01:28:59 PM »

The South Eastern Railway built this first bridge in 1860 which for some reason was known as the Queen's Bridge. This was later replaced in 1906 by the bascule bridge featured earlier. What looks like the Lord Nelson pub is visible toward the right.
 



 



When i used to go to Loves Farm Leysdown owned by my Uncles Partners Son to stay in a caravan we always caught the saloon coach from Gillingham Bus Station along the Lower Rainham Road to this bridge .....this was 1955 and my Aunt called it the "Queens Ferry Bridge" then and she explained that whoever is the Monarch of the time the bridge is named King or Queen so this should explain why in 1860 it was known as the "Queens Ferry Bridge" after Queen Victoria then also after 1953 Queen Elizabeth II ....why it is now called Kings Ferry Bridge who know`s?


Further to the Coach i found my Bus book as i used to collect Bus Numbers when a kid as my Mum & Dad were at Gillingham Bus Station in the 1940/50`s
This coach was built 1956 and the construction is on the page noted in the picture.

Nostalgia is a thing of the past

Online MartinR

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2019, 09:41:50 PM »
I have a paper version, but it seems similar.  The relevant quote is:
Quote
Tremseth Bridge broken by the violence of the sea in the 2lst year of Edward 1.
Since Edward reigned from 16 November 1272 – 7 July 1307 means it would be the winter (probably) of 1293/4.  I agree Capel Gate looks the most likely location for the ferry, but I don't have any specific details.  I can't see anything on the 1863 OS County series 1:2,500 map.  The other possible location would be the back road to Muswell manor.  We need to be a little careful in assuming that the fleet was always in its current location.  All of the land below the 5m contour might well have been part of Capel Fleet or the marshes at various times.  During the floods in 1893 the fleet spread out to be 100 yards wide.

Offline Smiffy

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2019, 03:18:04 PM »
MartinR, is this the publication you are referring to?

https://sheppeyhistory.uk/z-sheppey/churches/harty.html
 
I am assuming Capel gate is the location of the former ferry. It says that as late as 1893 the ferry house was still there but looking at maps from the same period I can find no trace of it.

Online MartinR

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2019, 08:54:57 AM »
See page 7 of: Patience, Colin; Perks, Hugh (ARICS), St, Thomas the Apostle, Isle of Harty, published by the church

Offline Smiffy

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2019, 12:31:51 AM »
I can't find any information about a flood in 1293, but I found that Canterbury Priory's bill for drainage and flood defences for 1293-94 was over £128, nearly double their annual income.


Online MartinR

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2019, 06:01:38 PM »
The "violent inundation" appears to have been in 1293.

Offline Smiffy

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridges
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2019, 05:38:16 PM »

The South Eastern Railway built this first bridge in 1860 which for some reason was known as the Queen's Bridge. This was later replaced in 1906 by the bascule bridge featured earlier. What looks like the Lord Nelson pub is visible toward the right.
 



 
There has been written elsewhere some erroneous information concerning an even earlier medieval bridge known as the Tremseth Bridge, which according to the historian Charles Igglesden was destroyed by a freak flood tide and never replaced. However, the Isle of Sheppey was at one time the Isles of Sheppey, with Harty and Elmley once separated from the main island, and this bridge actually connected Sheppey with Harty rather than Sheppey with the mainland. After it was lost, a ferry operated in its stead, until by the 18th century the dividing fleet became so completely silted up it was no longer needed.
 
From The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent by Edward Hasted, in reference to Harty:
 
"It appears by the pleas of the crown, in the 21st year of king Edward I taken before the justices itinerant, that there was formerly a bridge leading from hence into Shepey, then called Tremseth bridge, which had been broken down by a violent inundation of the sea, and the channel thereby made so deep, that a new one could not be laid, and therefore the inhabitants of Shepey, who before repaired it, maintained in the room of it two ferry-boats, to carry passengers to and fro".
 
"There is now no bridge here, and the fleet which divided this island from that of Shepey is become so very narrow, and has for several years past been so much filled up, that, excepting at high tides and overflow of the waters, Harty has ceased to have any appearance of an island".

Offline Smiffy

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridge
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2019, 01:18:14 PM »

I believe this photograph was taken on June 30th 1929 and depicts a celebration marking the removal of the toll. I can't find any information detailing what toll prices were, although the council are said to have paid the railway company £55,000 to abolish them, equivalent today to about £3.5 million.



Offline Local Hiker

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridge
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2019, 11:55:54 AM »
At the risk of going off topic, Smiffy did ask for more light on the coach in his original post https://thetransportlibrary.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=94616 (Invicta Alec's reference) https://www.flickr.com/photos/micastone/20600493234/in/photolist-xooUVQ-y3UWD6 (model photo)  https://www.classicbuses.co.uk/mdreg.html (mentioned way down the page, rebuild and transferred to Macclesfield in April 1965)

Offline stuartwaters

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridge
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2019, 11:39:22 AM »
I'll look into that Alec  :D
"I did not say the French would not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Admiral Sir John Jervis, 1st Earl St Vincent.

Offline Invicta Alec

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Re: Old Kingsferry Bridge
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2019, 11:19:29 AM »
WKM362 it is indeed. It tells us that the vehicle was first registered in Kent.


Out of sheer curiosity I did a Google search and found a newer picture which indicates that Maidstone and District sold it off to new owners in the Macclesfield area.


https://thetransportlibrary.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=20119

(just scroll down a picture or two)

Admin (Stuart) please note: I had wanted to give a "like" to smiffy's post, but it isn't an option on this category. Does it have to be turned on (or off) for individual categories?

Alec.