Author Topic: Paine's  (Read 159 times)

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KeithG

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2020, 12:34:46 PM »
Sometimes progress is not welcomed at all?
1971 Picture of Paines in Chatham High Street
Nostalgia is a thing of the past

Smiffy

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2020, 01:16:53 PM »
Using an inflation calculator, £4 in 1945 would now equate to about £174. Not far off what the state pension is now.

Dave Smith

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2020, 12:21:46 PM »
C261. I suspect drapers were different from clothiers or outfitters re commission. When I was first a sales engineer, we were paid a basic- on which you existed- & commission( on how much you exceeded your target) - on which you lived.

castle261

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2020, 04:09:50 PM »
William Paine could have been one of the air raid wardens, in one of the three big air raid shelters
in the Connie Banks on Magpie Hall Road. I remember them being built. They were dug into the
Conie Banks, then brick built with a concrete top, then half covered with soil & grass.

My wages in 1945 were £4.00 a week. I remember that well, a new line in DB suits, came in.
grey, with a white stripe. My manager liked it, so he had one. I asked if I could have one, &
pay for it, at two shillings & sixpence a week.( Not to wear at shop ) On my last day of work
there, at closing time he kept me waiting a long time for my wages, before I could leave.

George Carter had another shop, a hat shop, further along the road. Two assistants, left on
the same day, to work for Rochester Co-oP.

Smiffy

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2020, 01:32:09 PM »
Interesting that his parents lived in Letchworth Avenue, as around this time my Mother worked as a domestic there. Unfortunately I have no idea as to the names of the couple she worked for, but I do remember her saying how kind they were. Perhaps there was a connection, but as with many things like this it's now all a bit too late to find out.

Pete

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2020, 11:21:31 AM »
I worked in Chiesmans early '60s, commission was 1/80th ie 3d in the £ on top of a flat wage

alkhamhills

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2020, 08:17:19 PM »
William Elliott Paine
Born Chatham
He married Doris Elizabeth Hayes ¼ June 1935 Medway

In 1939 William(born 9.2.1907) with wife Doris E(21.6.1907) at 264 Magpie Rd, also  1 closed entry(a child) 
William was a Men’s Outfitters Manager & Doris Unpaid Domestic Duties.
William also an ARP Warden. Doris also Women’s Voluntary Service
His Parents at 27 Letchworth Ave Chatham, and Henry shown as Men’s Outfitter

In 1911 William with his parents Henry & Winifred & 2 siblings, at St John's Lodge, Upper Wrotham Road, Gravesend
Father Henry was an Outfitters Manager.

castle261

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2020, 06:37:59 PM »
I can answer one of your question - D.S.


Drapery assistants were not paid on commission, when I worked for George Carter & the Co-oP.


I am mystified by your other question --  `one (or two) & eleven three )


Prices always ending in three farthings --- because you had to go to the till - for the farthing
change, no putting it all, in your pocket. ( £ 19-11 three farthings ) No three farthing on my computer.

Dave Smith

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2020, 12:22:18 PM »
Colin. Maybe your Yard overalls came from there, or did the Yard have its own shop for that sort of thing? Not only chairs are missing, at my age I could certainly do with one, but no hats. And of course, all the stock is available on hangers so you help yourself- but can you find an assistant! I suspect that in those days, staff were on commission- a bit like Grace Brothers? Of course we didn't realise it at the time, just that they were very helpful. I was always mystified by the drapers measuring cloth by the yard at " one ( or two ) & eleven three"!

Colin walsh

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2020, 11:40:47 AM »
Hi all,just as I remember both shops,long time ago now but good memories ,after the yard closed I worked for Watts Charites ,for a while ,handyman,W pains supplied our overalls and out door clothing

CAT

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2020, 08:26:53 AM »
And attentive shop assistants too.

castle261

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Re: Paine's
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2020, 08:24:15 AM »
Notice something missing in today`s shops --- chairs. Always chairs to sit on while waiting.

Smiffy

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Paine's
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2020, 01:26:15 AM »
KeithG has already uploaded an external photo of the Chatham branch in another topic, so here's one of the interior. This view is not too different from what you would have seen as late as the 1960's:



Demolished in the 1970's, this was the Strood branch situated on the corner of Station road and the High street. After retiring in 1978, Mr W E Paine lived until the age of 98 before finally passing away in 2005.