Author Topic: `Reed Corrugated Industries `  (Read 61 times)

MartinR

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Re: `Reed Corrugated Industries `
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2019, 12:53:12 PM »
Thanks.  I learnt about this on a Sunday School trip to the Sheffield Express & Star during the 1960s.  At that date all newspaper printing was done by rotary letterpress.  It always puzzled me what the pink plastic/board was, it is moulded into shape code (IIRC wet), but when dry has to withstand around 300°C.
Later, whilst at school, I was involved with the school press which had two treadle operated presses and an electric Heidelberg platen press.  Typesetting was by hand into composing sticks, thence to the galleys and eventually to the formes.  I've retained an interest in printing since, but I'm afraid I couldn't remember my lowercase layout now after half a century!  I do remember "Open; money before questions and shock before a stroke; close" which is ( £ ? & ! / ), the top row of the upper case.

castle261

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Re: `Reed Corrugated Industries `
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2019, 11:52:47 AM »
Very interesting MartinR ----- We live and learn. I thought the flong rotated around the outside,
Were you in the `Print `in London !

MartinR

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Re: `Reed Corrugated Industries `
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2019, 12:57:29 PM »
Interesting about the flongs being manufactured there, but if I may I'll expand on their use.  Compositors set type into flat galleys from which the first proofs ("galley proofs") are taken.  When the galley has been corrected the flong takes a negative impression of the type.  The flong is then attached to the inside of a cylinder and a single curved typemetal plate cast against it.  This plate is then fixed to the rollers of a rotary press and is used to print the paper.  Without the use of a flong the type can be assembled in a forme, but then can only be used for platten printing which is much slower.

castle261

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`Reed Corrugated Industries `
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2019, 12:40:06 PM »
This factory was situated at the Paper Mill site at Aylesford. It made pink`FLONG` boards for the
Daily Mirror, also suitcase boarding. The flong boards were use to wrap around the printed metal
drums, the impression transferred on to the newspaper. The suitcase board were ten foot long x
six foot wide. Shifts were 6 to 2 pm / 1 to 10 pm / 10 to 6 am. I pm, so as men can get to football.

` Correction ` --- it should be ` Brookgate Industries `on the `Reed Corrugated site `.

The Daily Mirror often rejected the flong samples, sent to London.
The Daily Mirror `OWNED `Brookgate Industries `so why dilute the samples.