Author Topic: American Air Force F86F Jet Crash Nr Canterbury 1954  (Read 90 times)

John Walker

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Re: American Air force F86F Jet Crash Nr Canterbury 1954
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2019, 03:09:46 PM »
23rd August 1954 was my 4th birthday, so much too young to have known anything about this at the time, or even subsequently.


Reading that the investigation report came to no definite conclusions as to the cause, I assume that the pilot didn't survive?


Alec.


The pilot didn't survive sadly.   It's understood that there was a fuel leak in the fuselage that finally ignited.  I have the full report somewhere.  When I find it, I'll add more detail.

Invicta Alec

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Re: American Air force F86F Jet Crash Nr Canterbury 1954
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2019, 02:38:22 PM »
23rd August 1954 was my 4th birthday, so much too young to have known anything about this at the time, or even subsequently.


Reading that the investigation report came to no definite conclusions as to the cause, I assume that the pilot didn't survive?


Alec.




John Walker

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American Air Force F86F Jet Crash Nr Canterbury 1954
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2019, 12:41:02 PM »

This is a crash that I witnessed as a child.   I was playing in my back garden on Spring Lane Estate when there was a loud screeching sound.  I looked round to see a jet coming toward me with flames and smoke.  It passed very low over our roof and then there was a very loud explosion.   The jet had exploded in the air and crashed into a field about half a mile from my house.


From the official report.

At 12.59 on 23rd August 1954, F86F aircraft number 52-5420 took off from Manston Airfield on a routine test flight following periodic inspection.  Taxi and run up were normal although it was noted by the Mobile Control Officer that the engine run-ups were performed in the take off position.  All radio transmissions were routine and the aircraft was not observed after the turn from traffic.At 13.02 a lieutenant of the British Police observed an airborne explosion one and one half miles east of Canterbury, Kent, England.  This location is twelve miles south west of Manston.  The explosion disintegrated the aircraft and the parts landed as shown in the attached diagram.After study of all available facts and information concerning this accident, the Aircraft Accident Investigation Board has not been able to determine a definite cause faster.  Many probable causes have been probed, but subsequent investigation has eliminated these points from consideration.It is felt that further investigation in this case is beyond the capability of this board.  Therefore statements of the Accident Investigation Officer, the Material Officer, The General Electric Technical Representative, and the North American Technical Representative, outlining the action taken are enclosed to assist further study by higher headquarters.